11 National Monuments Endangered by Climate Change

Climate scientists have recently contended that rising sea levels and other significant effects of human-induced climate change are threatening 30 national monuments throughout the United States. We've compiled a quick list of these destinations and the reasons they are at risk.

 

Kennedy Space Center1. Kennedy National Space Center

Recent storm damages have undone countless renovations to the space center.

 

2. Cape Hatteras Lighthouse

This monument on the coast of North Carolina has already been moved inland once for $11 million to combat rising sea levels and coastal erosions.

 

3. Boston Faneuil Hill

This historic site has been at rising risk for flooding in the past few years.

 

4. Castillo de Marcos

The oldest masonry fort in North America, located in St. Augustine, Florida is at high risk for rising coastal waters.

 

5. Hawaii's Pu'uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park

The temple site and walking trails at this site have already suffered from rising seas and storm surges.

 

via wikimedia.org/commons

6. Mesa Verde National Park

Home to ancient Pueblo artifacts and ruins, this Colorado park is endangered by monsoon-like flooding and wildfires.

 

7. Bandelier National Monument

The ancient rock carvings at this New Mexico park are threatened by an increase in monsoon flooding.

 

8. Cape Krusenstern

This Alaskan park protects 4000 year old archaeological sites holding Inupiat Eskimo artifacts from nearby rising beach shores.

 

9. Jamestown Island

The Virginian location of the first colonial settlement in the U.S. has already suffered substantial submersion by powerful storms.

 

10. Groveland Hotel

This landmark built funded by gold from the first striking of the nation's biggest goldrush is endangered by frequent California wildfires.

 

via whitehouse.gov

11. Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument

This tribute to one of the great abolitionists is already facing damage from rising sea levels in Chesapeake Bay.

 

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