Anaheim Colony Historic District

Anaheim Colony Historic District

Pearson Park Anaheim AST

Pearson Park Anaheim AST

There are a total of 5 different, completely distinct historic districts throughout Anaheim, the very first one dedicated in the city going by the name of the Anaheim Colony Historic District. Not only is the very first historic district dedicated, it is also hands down the largest in Anaheim. Taking up 1.8 square miles, this 1997 adopted district has set boundaries matching the original German Colony Founded here in 1857. There are over 1,000 qualified historic structures within the district, technically bounded by North, South, East, and West Streets along Anaheim Boulevard and Lincoln Avenue. An easy way to know the boundaries of the Anaheim Colony Historic District is by spotting one of the 4 total Anaheim Colony Monuments, one at each entrance to the district.

Technically found over 2,000 years ago by Native American tribes settling along the Santa Ana River, Anaheim’s history more commonly dates back to 1857, when the original German Colony set up camp. It was historically known as Campo Aleman (German Camp) by its Spanish-speaking neighbors. A few German businessmen bought 1,165 acres of brush land here to begin a wine business by the Santa Ana. The names for this new colony were between Annaheim, which loosely translates to ‘home by the river’, Annagua, or Weinheim. Clearly, the first option won, residents quickly dropping the second N for convenience sake. 

 
One of the most popular points of interest is the Wohlgemuth House Cactus within Pearson Park, a 4-ton, 50-year-old cactus transported from the 1916 Wohlgemuth House. Your group should aim to set aside an hour or two here, exploring the first store, first school, first homes, early saloons, fashion stables, citrus packing plants, Pearson Park, and Kroeger-Melrose District. If you some extra time to kill plan a picnic here or head over to the Citrus Belt Land area, where you can learn about the process of cleaning, marking, grading, packing, recording, and shipping the local oranges across the nation, an important part of local history and industry!