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Philadelphia

 
philadelphia_pennsylvania_statueEducational student tours, student travel, field trips, and class trips to Philadelphia are growing in popularity. From sea to shining sea, Adventure Student Travel takes you to the best and most popular destinations in the United States and the “City of Brotherly Love” is quickly becoming a great choice for educational groups.
 
Normally the Liberty Bell comes to mind when thinking about Philadelphia. This American Symbol of National Pride is on display and is visited by numerous people each year. There is, however, a whole lot more available to see and experience in Philly. Philadelphia stands as one of the great destinations for student groups interested in our national history. From Ben Franklin to Betsy Ross to George Washington, Philadelphia tours give you the opportunity to see where our nation was originally founded.
 

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Sample Itineraries

Philadelphia 3-day Educational Tour

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This 2 day trip will allow your group to experience a variety of attraction Philadelphia has to offer.

    •  Two Nights Lodging
    •  America’s Oldest Zoo
    •  Two Museums

Attractions

Independence Seaport Museum

The Independence Seaport Museum is an interactive learning museum that student groups love. Learn about Philadelphia’s history as a port city and learn about all types of vessels that were used on the Delaware River.

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Philadelphia Zoo

Philadelphia Zoo

Credit: Philadelphia CVB

This zoo opened in 1874, which makes this America’s oldest zoo. Housing over 1600 animals from around the world this is a great place to stop for any tour group. Student groups always give raving reviews of this amazing zoo.

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Valley Forge

Go on a quick trip to Valley Forge. You can see the excellent Valley Forge national historic park or head over to the World of Scouting Museum. If those don’t sound appealing there is always the Freedoms Fountain or the National Memorial Arch.

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Vietnam War Memorial

Visit Philadelphia’s memorial from our nation’s longest war, the Vietnam War. This memorial was built so that others could learn and honor those who lost their lives in Vietnam. This is definitely an informative and moving memorial.

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National Constitution Center

Hanging flags

Credit: National Constitution Center

The National Constitution Center is just a short two blocks from the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall. Groups can spend time walking from one historic attraction to another. The Museum offers many programs that will help students to understand our nation’s history such as Signers’ Hall, Guess Who Game, Capture the Flag, and Print Shop, where students learn to print documents the way Benjamin Franklin printed them in an old-fashioned printing shop with a printing press from the 1700s. There are many other interactive programs as well, designed to help students learn historical facts as well as experience the satisfaction of a hands-on accomplishment.

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Liberty Bell

Liberty BellIt has been said that on July 7, 1776 the Liberty Bell rang to alert the citizens of Philadelphia that the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence was about to commence. The truth of the statement is unknown. The bell was ordered from the Whitechapel Bell Foundry in London and when it arrived, the very first ringing of the bell cracked the side. A new bell was promptly ordered. Over time the bell has sounded as an announcement for many important events in history such as the deaths of Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and others. It also rang on George Washington’s 100th birthday celebration in 1832. The second crack on the bell is believed to have occurred during the ring that announced the death of John Marshall who was Chief Justice of the United States of America. In 1835 the bell was removed from the steeple and was placed on display in the Declaration Chamber of Independence Hall.

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Independence Hall

Independence HallOriginally known as the Pennsylvania State House, Independence Hall is where the Declaration of Independence was argued and refined until it was finally adopted. The Constitution of the United States was also signed here. The Hall housed the Second Continental Congress, which was a gathering of men from each of the thirteen British North American colonies. The building itself is a part of Independence National Historic Park. The Declaration of Independence was read to the public near what we now know as Independence Square. A picture of Independence Hall is engraved on the back of the bicentennial Kennedy half dollar and is printed on the back of the U.S. $100 bill. A room within the Hall, the Assembly Room is also printed on the back of the United States two dollar bill.

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Franklin Institute Science Center

Franklin InstituteThe Franklin Institute Science Center houses many visiting exhibits each year such as Star Trek, Galileo, Amazing Caves and many more. All who visit can enjoy the Human Heart exhibit where we learn about the heart from the first beat of life to the last. Real Piratesis another exhibit that has stolen the hearts of all who visit. The movie Pirates of the Caribbean has created an infatuation with the life and times of early buccaneers who sailed the seven seas plundering the possessions of all who cross their paths. A visit to the Franklin Institute will increase your knowledge in more areas than one.

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Philadelphia Fort Mifflin

Fort Mifflin has been known by a few different names such as Fort Island Battery and Mud Island Fort. The fort is located on the Delaware River in the city of Philadelphia. Those who invest their time in preserving history offer demonstrations and history lessons on-site for many of the historical events that happened in the surrounding areas. During the war of the American Revolution Fort Mifflin was the site of the largest clash of colonists against the British. The Continental Army aided the men who served at the fort by delaying the British shipping. Because of it, 300 of the 450 men stationed there survived the battle. Fort Mifflin was used in its original capacity until 1954. The fort is the site of the only Revolutionary battlefield that is still completely intact. Today important documents can be viewed there such as correspondences from George Washington. Visitors can also tour the restored 14 buildings that make up the fort and walk the same paths the colonists walked in their day.

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Congress Hall

Part of Independence National Historical Park, one of the most visited tourist sites in the nation, Congress Hall is a popular part of Philadelphia educational tours.

Congress Hall was the meetinghouse for each state’s representatives and senators when Philadelphia was the capital of our country. This building has been restored so that when you step inside, you can truly step into history. The House of Representatives was located on the first floor with the Senate upstairs. In this upper room 28 of the 32 chairs are authentic as well as the Secretary’s desk. Both rooms are filled with furnishings and décor from the time period when congress met here. Even the carpet is an exact replica of the original. It was here that Presidents George Washington and John Adams were inaugurated and the Bill of Rights was ratified. Congress Hall is a very memorable stop for any historic tour of Philadelphia.

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Betsy Ross House

Credit: Philadelphia CVB

Elizabeth Griscom was known as Betsy by those in her community. She was a wife and mother living in the Quaker community of Philadelphia. Betsy married John Ross and the couple opened an upholstery shop in the neighborhood. When the war of Independence broke out John was called out as a member of the militia and was killed during the war. George Washington came to Betsy’s home in 1777 to ask if Betsy could make a flag based on a picture he had drawn on a piece of paper. The picture was the sketch of a flag with thirteen red and white stripes and thirteen six pointed stars. But Betsy made a slight modification to the sketch by creating the flag with thirteen red and white stripes and thirteen five pointed stars. This building at 239 Arch Street, which we now know as the Betsy Ross House, was built over 250 years ago.

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Academy of Natural Sciences

Over 17 million specimens from around the world make up the collections, displays, and magnificent dioramas in this museum. The Academy of Natural Sciences rests in the heart of Philadelphia’s cultural district and displays scientific artifacts from the Arctic to Central America, Africa, Asia, and beyond. Open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 on weekdays and until 5 p.m. on the weekends, this museum celebrates the beauty of nature and has been placing that beauty in the context of preservation since the collections were first put on display. The Academy researched environmental efforts long before it became a trend to do so.

Today its popular exhibits include a tropical garden with live Butterflies from Central and South America, Africa, and Asia. Dinosaur Hall displays more than 30 Mesozoic reptiles and offers an actual dig and fossil search to interested visitors. The Dioramas are the museum’s pride and joy, presenting landscapes and nature from around the globe. You’ll also find changing exhibits throughout the year, so your visit to the Academy of Natural Sciences is always a new and fresh experience.

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